Salvatore Lenzo, M.D. - Clinical Assistant Professor - Orthopaedic Surgery NYU - Hospital for joint Diseases, NYU Langone Medical Center Your Practice Online
 
Patient Info

Trigger Finger

Trigger finger is caused by the inflammation of the flexor tendons as they enter the flexor tendon sheath-pulley system within the finger and/or thumb. Because of chronic inflammation about the tendon, there is a triggering phenomenon as the tendon enters the tunnel. This can cause loss of joint motion both in the thumb and/or within the finger, typically within the middle knuckle. Initial treatment consists of an injection of cortisone preparation in an effort to decrease the inflammation around the tendon such that it can glide in and out of the tunnel freely. Studies have shown that this can be affective in up to 80 to 90% of patient treated. If this is not successful, then consideration for surgical intervention is warranted.

This is procedure which is done under local anesthesia and involves division of the AI pulley as well as removal of any inflammatory tissue around the tendon. Postoperative course includes keeping the wound clean and dry for approximately 2 weeks, but allow immediate mobilization of the fingers. Often therapy is not warranted after a trigger finger release and/or tenosynovectomy. i.e. flexor tendon sheath-pulley system the removal of inflamed tissue, above the flexor tendon. Trigger finger is often seen in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and/or visa versa. Other causes include post traumatic compression of the tendon and it is often seen in more systemic diseases such as diabetes, arthritis and/or arthritides.

Trigger Finger    

 

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